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Screening program for Police Canines

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police_dog_screening1Police canines are highly trained partners in law enforcement teams that possess a variety of skills. The training involved to develop an effective police canine is arduous, beginning early in life and spanning many phases before the certification is given. The development of orthopedic disease late in training or early in a police canine’s life is common and can result in premature retirement, leaving the officer without this essential assistance until a new police canine can be trained. The financial burden of training and time lost have a substantial impact on police canine training facilities. Most of the juvenile orthopedic conditions affecting police canines can be detected early in life and in many cases successfully treated.

Our goal is to develop non invasive methods to screen prospective police dogs for juvenile orthopedic diseases.

 

screeningTitle of Proposed Study:    Screening program for Police Canines                   
Problem:
Police canines are highly trained partners in law enforcement teams that possess a variety of skills including: apprehension, detection (drugs, explosives, and injured people) and deterence. The training involved in developing effective police canines is arduous, beginning early in life and continues through many phases before the certification is given. The development of orthopedic disease late in training or early in a police canine’s life can result in premature retirement from a career in police work leaving officers without this essential assistance until a new police canine can be trained and paired with them. The financial burden of training and time lost have a substantial impact on police canine training facilities, if even a single dog cannot continue with its expected career. Most of the juvenile orthopedic conditions affecting police canines can be detected early in life and in many cases successfully treated if diagnosed in the earliest phases of the condition.

Objective:
To develop non invasive screening programs using traditional methods like radiography and evolving technologies like force-plate analysis and medical infrared imaging to screen prospective police canines for juvenile orthopedic diseases.

Screening2Background:
Police canines are called upon to perform a variety of law enforcement tasks including search and rescue. Significant costs and countless hours are invested in the development of a successful police canine team. Police canine are expected to provide service for many years before retiring because of age related limitations. Premature retirement from a police canine career substantially impacts police canine training facilities both financially and logistically. Additionally, the officer in need must be paired with a new police canine having lost valuable time training with a police canine found to be unable to fulfill its duties. Several studies at Long Island Veterinary Specialists, in collaboration with The Guide Dog Foundation of Smithtown, NY, have already proven successful in the early detection and treatment of juvenile orthopedic diseases.

Materials and Methods:
Using medical infrared imaging, forceplate analysis and traditional radiography, a standardized screening program would be developed to screen dogs as they enter the training program and again one year later. Fifty dogs each year would be anticipated for an effective program.

Budget
1. Salaries  = $200 per dog donated by the staff at Long Island Veterinary Specialists (LIVS)
2. Initial diagnostics per dog =$700
3. Follow up diagnostics per dog  =$700

Total   $80,000
 

Police K9 Screening

Police K9 Screening program